Slig blade essay

There’s a lot to dissect in the booklet, which is written in first person from the perspective of Dominus Calus , the Cabal’s emperor at one time, in the form of a letter. It paints a much more complex picture of the faction and its history in which the Cabal appear to have enjoyed periods of great peace and prosperity in-between bouts of war and conflict. There are parallels to the Roman empire, an obvious real world inspiration for the alien race which was responsible for lots of art and culture in addition to brutal campaigns of military conquest. In the opening portion of the letter, Calus writes,

The primary reason I spent a whole 10 minutes poring over just one line of dialogue in the first episode was to illustrate just how terse Japanese is—a lot of nuance fits into very few characters. Translators of these old-time text-only Japanese role-playing games had to make every English letter count to fit dialogue into the tiny text boxes. What I’m doing with this series isn’t criticizing or even smack-talking the original translation. No, I totally applaud the efforts of the translator who crunched under a horrifying deadline to get Final Fantasy VII finished. Heck, thanks to that translator, I got to play the game in 1997. These videos, then, exist to look at the meaning that couldn’t make it into the little text boxes. Though uh, yeah, in this episode, we do find a text box the translator forgot to translate.

Slig blade essay

slig blade essay

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slig blade essay